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Wednesday Afternoon News, October 10

Examining Plymouth County Drug Court - Part 1

(Le Mars) -- Last week the Plymouth County Drug Court hosted the Chamber of Commerce coffee as
a way to help educate the public about Drug Court and its purpose and responsibilities.  Plymouth County Drug Court Executive Director Don Nore says Drug Court isn't set up to pass judgement on those people convicted of crimes with addictions to drugs, alcohol, or other addictions.  He says Drug Court offers a counseling session to help the offenders.

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Nore says incarceration is not always the answer for those with drug or alcohol addictions

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Nore says the Plymouth County Drug Court program is successful and rather unique to the state of Iowa. 
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He says the Plymouth County Drug Court operates on a "shoestring" budget.

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The Drug Court executive director says 23 individuals are currently attending drug court.  Over the past five years, the local program has had 126 people attend.  Nore says although the drug court is successful, he admits that not all people are able to graduate from drug court.  Sometimes, if the person violates their parole terms, that individual is placed in jail or prison. Tomorrow we will continue our series of reports on the Plymouth County Drug Court and we'll hear the comments from a local judge.


Cedar Rapids City Council Approves Plan For Casino

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (AP) - The Cedar Rapids City Council has voted to support local developers in their quest to build a casino on the area.
The council on Tuesday unanimously approved a proposal that says the council will exclusively support Steve Gray and his investor group in obtaining a state gambling license and building a casino.
The Linn County Board of Supervisors has already indicated its support.
Gray says his group is preparing a petition drive to force a referendum election next year, asking Linn County voters to approve gambling in the county. If they do, Gray's group would ask the Iowa
Racing and Gaming Commission for a license.
Gray and his group want to invest $80 million to $100 million to build a casino in or near Cedar Rapids.


Animal Rights Group Wants Stiffer Penalty On Des Moines Police Officer

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - A Des Moines-based animal rights group wants harsher penalties for a Des Moines police officer over the death of a police dog in a hot car.
Officer Brian Mathis received a three-day unpaid suspension for leaving the dog in an unmarked car at the police station for over an hour in August.
Lin Sorenson, the founder of St. Francis Foundation for Pets, says the suspension is not adequate.  She wants Mathis to pay back taxpayers for the cost of the dog.
Sorenson is asking for $25,000 for the cost of the dog, his training and possible damage to the car if he fought to escape.
Police spokesman Sgt. Chris Scott says officials decided against criminal charges because they found no criminal intent.

 

DNR To Investigate Deer Disease

OTTUMWA, Iowa (AP) - Wildlife officials will meet with landowners in southern Iowa to discuss plans to contain chronic wasting disease, which was found in an area deer this summer.
Iowa Department of Natural Resources officials will meet Oct. 15 in Ottumwa to outline plans to collect additional samples for testing in Davis and Wapello counties during the deer hunting
season.
A deer tested positive for the disease at a hunting preserve near Bloomfield in July, marking the first time it has been confirmed in Iowa. The disease damages animals' brain tissue, causing illness and eventually death.
The DNR says landowners will be key to its plan to stop the disease from spreading. Officials will collect samples from hunters and lockers where deer are processed to study the health of the
wild herd.




 

 

 

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