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Wednesday News, July 29

First Day of Fair Schedule

(Le Mars) -- As mentioned earlier, today marks the start of the Plymouth County Fair.  Ann Schoenrock, Plymouth County Extension Co-Program Coordinator says today is when the young exhibitors will enter their livestock projects.

(sot) Schoenrock 1st day1

Once the livestock is in their proper pens and stalls, Schoenrock says a livestock judging contest will then take place.

(sot) Schoenrock 1st day2

Also at 1:00 p.m. is the judging of rabbits.

(sot) Schoenrock 1st day3

Open class exhibits can be entered today between 7:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. The bucket calf judging will begin at 6:00 p.m. and the entertainment at the grandstand consists of Figure 8 racing.  But perhaps the highlight of the day will be the crowning of the new King and Queen to be held at the Pioneer Village stage at 7:00 p.m.

(sot) Schoenrock 1st day4

 

 

 

 

Harvey Offers Philosophy On Agriculture

(Le Mars) -- During the Chamber Coffee held Tuesday at the Round Barn at the Plymouth County Fairgrounds, Akron farmer Brad Harvey was presented the Outstanding Service to Agriculture Award.  Harvey, raises hogs and cattle and grows row crops.  He is actively involved with many agricultural based organizations including Plymouth County Farm Bureau where at one time he served on the Iowa Farm Bureau Young Farmer Committee.  Harvey is a member of the Plymouth County Fairboard, as well as a Plymouth County Extension Board member.  Harvey says he was pleasantly surprised at the honor.

(sot) Harvey1

Harvey has been farming for 28 years and he says during that time, agriculture has changed.

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Harvey says more people are becoming generations removed from production agriculture, and as a result, more people are not fully aware and understanding the importance of agriculture.

(sot) Harvey3

The fair board director and award recipient says the Plymouth County fair serves as a nice venue to educate the public about agriculture.

 

 

 

 

Sioux City Man Pleads Not Guilty To Kidnapping

SIOUX CITY, Iowa (AP) - An 18-year-old Sioux City man has pleaded not guilty to kidnappings linked to a dispute over drug dealings.
The Sioux City Journal reports (http://bit.ly/1SMtVEv ) that Isaiah Mothershed entered his plea Monday in Woodbury County District Court. He's charged with two counts of kidnapping and two counts of willful injury.
Court documents say two people who went to buy marijuana from Mothershed on July 7 were bound and blindfolded by him after he accused them of helping another person steal his pot. The documents say he used a hot object to burn their faces and struck one of them with a shotgun.
The documents say Mothershed then forced them into the trunk of his car, but they escaped later when he stopped and left the car to go into a house.

 

 

 

 

Governor Branstad Extends Disaster Proclamation For Bird Flu

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - Gov. Terry Branstad has extended a state of disaster emergency through Aug. 30 in response to the bird flu outbreak in the state.
The declaration Tuesday is the third extension of the original disaster proclamation. It otherwise would have expired Friday.
The virus has infected more than 31.5 million birds in Iowa, mostly egg-laying chickens, making the state the hardest hit in the nation.
Branstad's declaration activates disaster response programs, allows the use of state supplies and makes other efforts to speed response efforts. 
Branstad says disposal of dead birds and disinfection of barns has been completed and turkey farms are expected to be ready for restocking by the end of August. Some chicken operations may be ready for new birds in September.

 

 

 

Government Expected To Pay Nearly $200 Million on Bird Flu

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - The federal government expects to spend $191 million to pay chicken and turkey farmers for birds lost to avian flu.
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack says that's in addition to the nearly $400 million spent on cleaning up dead birds and disinfecting barns. The government also is paying to research and stockpile a bird flu vaccine. 
Vilsack spoke Tuesday at a bird flu conference in Des Moines where the poultry industry is talking about how to better respond if the disease returns.
Hardest hit by the outbreak this spring were Iowa, Minnesota and Nebraska.
Vilsack says the USDA is preparing for recurrence of the virus spread by wild migrating birds and plans to ask Congress to consider a poultry disaster program similar to one that exists for livestock producers.

 

 

 

 

Branstad's Chief Of Staff Resigns

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - Gov. Terry Branstad's chief of staff Matt Hinch says he is resigning for a career in the private sector.
Hinch announced his plans in a news release Wednesday, but did not provide details about his next job. His last day in the governor's office will be Aug. 7.
The 35-year-old Hinch has been serving in his current role since 2013. He is the second chief of staff to Branstad since the governor returned to public office in 2011. 
In a statement Branstad called Hinch an "exceptional leader," noting his work on issues like student debt and infrastructure. 
Branstad spokesman Jimmy Centers says the governor will name a new chief of staff in the near future.

 

 

 

 

Minority Summit Looks At Criminal Justice

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - State and community leaders say the state needs to reduce disparities in the number of minorities in Iowa's criminal justice system, and they hope an upcoming summit will focus attention on the issue.
Leaders including Gov. Terry Branstad spoke Wednesday at the Capitol while introducing the two-day summit in Ankeny in late August. The Iowa-Nebraska National Association for the Advancement of Colored People will host.
Iowa-Nebraska NAACP President Betty Andrews says data show Iowa incarcerates African Americans at a high rate.
Branstad, who will make his first appearance at the annual summit, says Iowa has made progress but more work is needed.
Topics at the summit include fair hiring practices and racial profiling. Community leaders say they hope previously introduced legislation on those issues will pick up momentum next session.

 

 

 

 

Charges Dropped Against Chinese Woman Suspected Of Stealing Trade Patents On Seed Corn

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - A judge has dismissed charges against the wife of a Chinese billionaire accused of taking part in a scheme to steal trade secrets from U.S. corn companies.
The order signed Tuesday instructs the government to return Mo Yun's passport, meaning she can return to China.
Investigators allege that Mo, her brother and five other Chinese nationals were working for a seed subsidiary of China-based DBN Group when they stole seeds from Iowa cornfields and shipped them out of the country in 2011 and 2012.
Prosecutors asked that the charges be dropped against Mo after a judge ruled that investigators couldn't use partial instant messages found on her brother's computer.
Mo's husband is DBN Group Chairman Shao Genhou, who has a net worth estimated at $1.4 billion. He hasn't been charged.

 

 

 




   

Tuesday Afternoon News, July 28

Regents Propose Raising Tuition By 3 Percent For Spring Semester

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) - Undergraduate students at Iowa's three public universities may have to pay $100 more for tuition next spring.
The Iowa Board of Regents released a proposal Tuesday for a 3 percent tuition increase to go into effect for the spring 2016 semester.
The board will discuss the increase next week and is expected to vote in September.
The increase would mean that full-time undergraduate resident students at the University of Iowa, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa would pay $100 more.
The proposal says that lawmakers only gave the schools a $6.5 million base budget increase, far less than the regents requested.
Earlier this month, Gov. Terry Branstad vetoed an additional $6.2 million in one-time funding for the schools that had been approved by lawmakers.

 

 

 

 

 

Prisoners Still On Lockdown

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) - Inmates at Iowa's maximum-security prison are still facing tight security measures that were imposed after a dangerous felon managed to escape three weeks ago.
Inmates at the Iowa State Penitentiary remain on restricted movement status, which means they are confined to their cells for the vast majority of the time.
Prison officials imposed the lockdown July 5, after inmate Justin Kestner escaped from one of the state's highest-security cells. He was captured several hours later in Illinois.
Penitentiary spokeswoman Rebecca Bowker says the restricted movement will remain in place "per security concerns and operational needs" but didn't elaborate. A notice on the prison's website says visitors will not be allowed from July 31 through Aug. 3.
Iowa ombudsman Ruth Cooperrider says she wants an explanation for the ongoing security crackdown.

 

 

 

 

 

Raptor Director Dies

DECORAH, Iowa (AP) - The man behind the famed eagle cam in northeast Iowa has died.
Scott Fjelstul (FEHL'-stool) of Fjelstul Funeral Home said Tuesday that Bob Anderson died Monday at a hospital in Decorah (deh-KOR'-uh). Anderson was 64. Fjelstul would not provide the cause of death.
Anderson was executive director and the guiding force behind the Raptor Resource Project. The project installed its first camera in the eagle nest in 2007. The live video feed showed a nest 80 feet up in a tree overlooking the Decorah Fish Hatchery. The organization says more than 200 million views of the website were made in 2011 from people in 184 countries.
Organization officials say Anderson was proud of his efforts with the Decorah eagles, but "his heart was truly in his peregrine falcon recovery work."

 

 

 

 

Bird Flu Conference

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - The federal government expects to spend $191 million to pay chicken and turkey farmers for birds lost to avian flu.
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack says that's in addition to the nearly $400 million spent on cleaning up dead birds and disinfecting barns. The government also is paying to research and stockpile a bird flu vaccine.
Vilsack spoke Tuesday at a bird flu conference in Des Moines where the poultry industry is talking about how to better respond if the disease returns.
Hardest hit by the outbreak this spring were Iowa, Minnesota and Nebraska.
Vilsack says the USDA is preparing for recurrence of the virus spread by wild migrating birds and plans to ask Congress to consider a poultry disaster program similar to one that exists for livestock producers.

 

 

 

 

Sioux City Mansion Gets Another Chance

SIOUX CITY, Iowa (AP) - The City Council has given another demolition reprieve to a 125-year-old home in Sioux City's historic Rose Hill district.
The council voted on Monday to give Jim Gengler the extra time to either repair or sell the home.
It was flagged by the city in August 2013 for severe rot and other structural issues. This past February the council gave Salvador Carrasco 150 days to at least make significant progress on renovations. City records say he has not. On Monday Gengler told the council that he's bought the home from Carrasco.



   

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