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Agri-Line - Le Mars Agricultural Connection

AGP Names New CFO

(Omaha) -- Scott Simmelink has been named Group Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (CFO) at Ag Processing Inc. a cooperative (AGP).  Simmelink, who has 30 years of finance, accounting and business experience, succeeds Keith Spackler, who was appointed CEO by the AGP Board of Directors on September 2, 2012.

"With over 30 years of progressively responsible leadership experience in accounting and financial management for both Fortune 500 and privately-held companies, Scott brings an excellent blend of budget and financial administration, project leadership, and sound business expertise," said Spackler.  "Scott will make a great addition to our executive management team."

Simmelink began his new position with AGP on January 2.  He was previously employed as Director of Financial Services with Consolidated Container Company of Omaha.  He was responsible for various aspects of accounting, financial reporting, cash managment, customer and equity owner relations, credit, financial compliance, and other financial services.  Additionally, he was extensively involved in numerous acquisitions and related financing.  His career also includes financial experience with Compaq Direct, Inacom, Coleman Powermate, and Colman Company, Inc.

Simmelink has deep agricultural roots, being born and raised on a crop/cattle farm near Lebanon, Kansas.  He has a B.A. degree in Finance/Business Management from Bethany College, Lindsborg, Kansas.  Scott and his wife reside in Waterloo, Nebraska.  They have three grown children and two grandchildren.

AGP, the largest farmer-owned soybean processor in the world, is owned by 179 local and regional cooperatives representing over 250,000 farmers from 15 states throughout the United States.  Corporate headquarters are located in Omaha, Nebraska.

   

Iowa Land Values On The Rise...Again

(Ames) -- Iowa land values have once again risen over last year and according to Mike Duffy, Agricultural Economist with Iowa State University, in many cases, new records were established. Duffy noted northwest Iowa saw the largest increase in land values.
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Duffy says there are a number of factors that are helping drive the land values higher including good investment opportunities, the need for additional land for manure application for livestock and poultry producers, but he says the most mentioned driving factor are higher commodity prices.

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There are some people, including Iowa Senator Tom Harkin, who believe farmers are entering an era much like the 70's when grain and land prices were high, only to see the bubble burst, causing a recession era which occurred in the 1980's.  Duffy says although there are some farmers that may be over-extended with their financing, he doesn't see it being a wide spread problem, at least not just yet.

 

Iowa Soybean Association Applauds Governor's Action On Reducing Nutrient Runoff

Ankeny, Iowa (AP) - Environmentalists say it doesn't go far enough, but the Iowa Soybean Association is praising Gov. Terry Branstad's strategy to keep harmful nutrients from reaching Iowa
waterways and the Gulf of Mexico.
Association leaders who met in Ankeny this week reaffirmed their support for the plan, which was released last month. ISA President Mark Jackson says the plan is based on science, recognizes the
diversity of the state's landscape and is "much more effective than a costly, one-size-fits-all effort to improve water quality."
The plan calls on wastewater treatment plants to make upgrades to reduce their discharges into waterways. But it asks farmers to take voluntary steps to reduce the runoff caused by fertilizers and
manure on farm fields.
Critics say they doubt a voluntary approach will have much impact.


Iowa Pork Congress Scheduled

(Clive, Iowa) -- The Iowa Pork Producers Association (IPPA) will hold the 2013 Iowa Pork Congress January 23 and 24 at the Iowa Events Center in Des Moines.

The nation's largest winter swine tradeshow and conference will be held in Hy-Vee Hall at the Iowa Events Center.  Pork Congress hours will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. January 23 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on January 24.  The Iowa Pork Foundation's annual Kickoff Reception and Auction will be held at Hy-Vee Hall on January 22 and the IPPA Youth Swine Judging Contest will be held in the Pioneer Livestock Pavilion at the Iowa State Fairgrounds on January 24.

"Pork Congress encompasses every aspect of the pork industry and I encourage anyone involved in pork production to make plans to attend," said IPPA President Bill Tentinger of Le Mars, Iowa.  "The tradeshow, seminars, social functions, youth activities and networking opportunities always attract thousands of people from around the Midwest and we're hoping for another great turnout this year."

Nearly 300 companies will exhibit in spacious Hy-Vee Hall and several will be introducing new products.  IPPA will welcome attendees to the Pork Information Plaza where guests can visit with producer leaders and representatives from the National Pork Board, National Pork Producers Council and other affiliated organizations.

A wide range of seminars will be held at no additional charge.  Topics include animal health, sow housing, pit foaming and swine reproduction.  Attendees can get updates on regulations and nuisance cases, public policy and an industry economic outlook.  Dr. David Kohl from Virginia Tech University will address transition management in the keynote presentation.  Producers can obtain or renew their PQA Plus and TQA certifications, and a certification session for confinement site manure applicators is being offered.

 

 

 

 

   

Crop Insurance Payments

 

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture says farmers who chose to pay more to insure their crops at harvest prices will receive $7.50 per bushel for corn.
That should be welcome news for corn farmers in Iowa, Illinois and Nebraska, the nation's three largest corn producers, respectively.
The Des Moines Register also reports that the harvest price payout for soybeans will be $15.39 per bushel.
Farmers who elected to be covered by the less expensive non-harvest price coverage will receive the $5.68 per bushel for corn and $12.55 per bushel for soybeans. Those prices were set in
March at the time of insurance sign-up.
USDA figures show crop-loss insurance payments through October 29th totaled $3.5 billion nationally, including $1.63 billion for corn and $247.6 million for soybeans.

   

Farmers Nearly Done With Harvest

Farmers Are Nearly Done With Harvest

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - Iowa farmers are very close to wrapping up this year's harvest, but work was delayed by some much-needed rain.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture says 93 percent of the corn crop has been harvested, which is a month ahead of schedule.  Ninety-six percent of the soybean crop is in, almost three weeks ahead of normal.
The USDA says in Monday's weekly report that widespread rain helped Iowa's pasture and range land, but 73 percent is in very poor or poor condition. Hay supplies are running about 42 percent
short.
A slow-moving storm system brought rain to the state on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. The statewide average was a-half inch, just shy of the weekly normal of 0.56 inches.

 

   

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