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Agri-Line - Le Mars Agricultural Connection

Farmers Can Harvest CRP and WRP

DES MOINES – Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey today announced that farmers that have Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) or Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) lands available for harvesting, can now be included in the Iowa hay and straw directory.  The change is in response to the USDA announcement that both of these programs can now be used for haying and grazing in response to the drought conditions.

 

“The drought has severely impacted the amount of forage available, so it is good news that USDA has made CRP and WRP lands available for emergency haying and grazing.  We hope the directory helps connect farmers that have CRP or WRP lands with those that have livestock and need the feed,” Northey said.  “It is important that any farmer interested in the emergency haying program should contact their local FSA or NRCS office before proceeding.”

 

The authorization for haying and grazing of CRP and WRP became effective today, August 2nd and haying activities must be completed by August 31, 2012. For more information on haying CRP land farmers can contact their local USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) office or visit FSA online at www.fsa.usda.gov/.  For information on haying WRP land farmers can contact their local USDA National Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) office or visit http://www.ia.nrcs.usda.gov/.

 

In additional to listing farmers with CRP or WRP lands available, the Iowa Hay and Straw Directory lists producers with hay and straw for sale, as well as organizations and businesses associated with promoting and marketing quality hay and straw.

 

Farmers interested in listing should visit the Department’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov.  An application form can be found by going to the “Home Page” and then clicking on the Marketing tab on the top of the page”  and then selecting  Hay and Straw in the right hand column.  This will take you directly to the Hay & Straw Directory.

 

For those without internet access, please call the Hay/Straw Hotline at 800-383-5079.  The Department will fax or send a printed copy of the application to be filled out.

 

   

Northey Visits Marcus, Remsen

(Remsen) -- Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey made a stop in both Marcus and Remsen on Monday.  Northey, a farmer from Spirit Lake, says this summer's drought has similarities to the 1988 drought. He says several regions of the state are suffering, particularly east-central Iowa.

 

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However, he also says their are some pockets within the state that have not been adversely affected by the dry conditions.

 

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Northey says most of the government sponsored disaster programs are coordinated at the federal level, but he says the state department of agriculture are standing by to help.

 

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The state secretary of agriculture toured both the Little Sioux Corn Processors in Marcus and he visited the Remsen Processing in Remsen.  Iowa's corn crop has deteriorated further with 40 percent now in very poor or poor condition. A week ago it was 27 percent.

The USDA says it has received reports of farmers chopping down their corn.

Just 23 percent of the crop is in good to excellent condition down from 36 percent a week earlier.

For Iowa soybeans 30 percent are now in very poor or poor condition. It was 20 percent a week ago. Just 28 percent of the crop is in good or excellent condition down from 38 percent a week ago.

Nationally, 45 percent of the corn crop is very poor or poor.  Last week it was 38 percent.

For soybeans, 35 percent is now poor or very poor compared with the 30 percent a week earlier.

   

Ag Economist Concern About Next Year

Ag Economist Concerned About Next Year

(Ames) -- Although grain prices are spiking as a result of the drought, a retired agricultural economist believes this year's drought may have additional consequences into next year.  Robert Wisner with Iowa State University says that South America also suffered a drought this past growing season, and he says along with the U-S drought, farmers in both regions will be tempted to plant every available acre next year, which may cause a steep decline in commodity prices.
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Wisner says as a result of the drought, consumers will begin seeing higher prices at the supermarket; first with milk, then with poultry, and finally with red meat products like beef and pork.
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Wisner says in the short-term, there may be bargains with poultry and red-meat products as farmers flood the market selling their stock, but in the long-term, meat may be in short supply.

   

Pork Producers Worried About High Grain Prices

Local Pork Producer Worried About High Grain Prices

 

(Le Mars) -- With corn selling at more than $7.00 a bushel and soybeans at more than $16.00 a bushel, and with expectations for even higher prices as the nation's drought worsens, livestock producers, and especially swine and poultry producers are worried about the rising price of grain.  Bill Tentinger is a pork producer from Le Mars.  He also serves as the president of the Iowa Pork Producers Association. He spoke on behalf of the state's pork producers during a drought meeting held Tuesday and hosted by Governor Terry Branstad.  Tentinger says there are many pork producers that are quitting the business because grain prices are too costly.

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The Plymouth County pork producer says he offered a message to Governor Branstad.

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Tentinger says he isn't certain if packers are already loaded with culled sows, or if the packer knows that more will come, and they are waiting for the market price to fall.

   

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