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Agri-Line - Le Mars Agricultural Connection

Sioux County Farmland Sells At $17,300/acre

(Hospers) -- Despite low agricultural commodity prices, land still seems to be in high demand with buyers willing to spend near record levels.  At a Sioux County land auction held on Friday near Hospers, a tract of 154 acres sold at $17,300 an acre.  Jim Klein of Remsen was the auctioneer for the sale.  He says the land sold is of high quality with a history of being very productive.

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Klein says the land was sold to a local neighboring farmer that had land already adjacent to the land that sold.

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The price per acre is not a record for Sioux County land sales, as a parcel of land sold for more than $20,000 an acre nearly two years ago, but as Klein says with lower grain prices, the expectation would be that land value would also decline.

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Sioux County is a leader in livestock and poultry production, and Klein believes one reason for the high demand for land is so farmers have somewhere to dispose manure.

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Klein says the tract of land did bring several bidders at the start of the sale.  He says this was the highest price paid for land that he has had a role in selling.

   

Corn Harvest Nearing Completion

(Le Mars) -- Ideal weather conditions have allowed farmers to harvest corn at a faster than normal pace, with some agricultural officials saying as much as two-thirds of the region's corn have already been harvested.  Iowa State University Extension Crop Specialist Joel DeJong says many farmers are reporting high yields, and are nearing completion.

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Yields have also been good, averaging near or above 200 bushels per acre.

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DeJong says the recent warm, dry and windy days have helped reduce corn moisture levels so many farmers have not needed to artificially dry their corn.

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The ISU crops specialist says some farmers have noticed stalk rot due to the excessive rains from July, August and September, and have managed the harvest accordingly.

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DeJong says soil temperatures are still too warm for farmers to apply any anhydrous ammonia fertilizer, and he is also concerned about the liiquid manure that is being applied on some harvested fields.

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Soybean Harvest Making Progress

(Le Mars) -- Farmers have been making progress with this year's harvest with many reports of soybean yields higher than from previous years.  Doug Schurr is the manager of the Farmers Cooperative Elevator based in Craig located in the northwest portion of Plymouth County.  He says the soybean yields in his area have been very good.

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Schurr says the quality of the soybean harvest has also been good.

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Diagonally across Plymouth County to Kingsley at the Farmers Elevator, Chris Pedersen says the soybean harvest in his area has also been good.

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Pedersen says farmers in the southeast corner of Plymouth County had a slower start to this year's harvest, but have since picked up the pace.

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As for the northwest area of Plymouth County, Schurr estimates the soybean harvest will soon be wrapping up for the year.

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Some farmers have had to deal with white mold found on their soybean plants in isolated areas of their fields.  Chris Pedersen says the yields certainly have reflected the plant disease.

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Both at Craig and at Kingsley, the corn harvest is just beginning, and the grain elevator managers say it is still too early to determine the yield potential.

 

   

U-S Court of Appeals Stops EPA Rules On WOTUS

(Des Moines) -- Farmers, ranchers, and even contractors are breathing a sigh of relief following a ruling last week by the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals out of Cincinatti, Ohio, regarding the controversial rules established by the Environmental Protection Agency and the U-S Army Corps of Engineers on the Waters of the United States.  The court decided to place a temporary stay on the implementation of proposed rules by the EPA.  Chris Gruenhagen of the Iowa Farm Bureau government relations counsel says the decision by the court is a "key step" to stopping EPA's broad definition of navigational waters.  You may recall, the original rules would have allowed the EPA to have jurisdiction on grass waterways, small streams, and even erodible gullies.

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Gruenhagen says it may be several months before a final court ruling will be determined.

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Many farm organizations, including the Iowa Farm Bureau, are requesting Congress to pass legislation that would permanently prohibit the EPA from implementing the far-reaching rules regulating the nation's waterways. A study by the Iowa Farm Bureau showed that 97 percent of the state of Iowa would be adversely affected by the proposed EPA rules.  She says the proposed rules are confusing.

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Gruenhagen says ultimately, if the EPA rulings go into effect, it would be a tedious and costly measure for everyone in agriculture.

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